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Oyster stuffing with shitake mushrooms and leeks

Oyster stuffing with shiitake mushrooms and leeks

Oyster stuffing is a favorite of mine. It’s a tradition in my family, and this recipe takes it up a notch with shiitake mushrooms and leeks. It’s basically a combination of some of my favorite things, in one rich – yet delicate – dish.

If you grew up along the coast, like I did. Raw oysters are an initiation of sorts. You are an adult if you eat them. If you eat them, you crave them. You covet them.

When I looked online for oyster stuffing recipes, I was a little mortified. Canned oysters? Why on earth would anyone use canned oysters? I know a lot of people do, and I don’t want to turn my nose up at the stuff (I know, I kind of am). I won’t hate you if you use them, but the fresh oysters you find in the refrigerated seafood section are so much better. Ridiculously better. They are sweet and briny and smell like the ocean, not fishy. The fresher your oysters, the less fishy the stuffing.

The way I see it, you only make oyster stuffing once a year. It’s a special occasion, so let’s do the right thing and splurge on the good stuff. If you really want to go all out, get a couple dozen fresh oysters, take them home and shuck them yourself (saving some to eat right away, of course).

There is too much of a good thing, though. One Thanksgiving, my mother decided to double the amount of oysters in her stuffing. She stuffed the turkey and after an hour or so, the whole house smelled like fishy turkey. It permeated the bird, the gravy, the stuffing.  We tease her about it every Thanksgiving.

Oyster stuffing with shitake mushrooms and leeks

Oyster stuffing with shitake mushrooms and leeks

Oyster stuffing with shiitake mushrooms and leeks

Very slightly adapted from Bon Appetit, November 2000

Oyster stuffing with shiitake mushrooms and leeks

Ingredients

  • 1 pound firm white fresh bread, cut into 3/4-inch cubes (about 10 cups)
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
  • 1 pound shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, caps cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 3 large celery stalks with leaves, chopped
  • 3 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only), chopped (about 3 cups)
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon crumbled dried sage leaves
  • 2 8-ounce jars fresh shucked oysters, cut into 1-inch pieces (reserve the liquid)
  • 1/2 cup reserved oyster liquid
  • 1 cup turkey or chicken stock

Method

Preheat oven to 325° F/165° C

First, you need to dry out the bread. Arrange it in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake for 12 minutes, until crisp, dry and golden brown. This can be prepared ahead. You could also use stale bread and skip the baking step.

Butter a casserole dish. In a skillet, melt 4 tablespoons of the butter over medium-high heat. Saute the mushrooms in the butter until they turn brown and their liquid evaporates. Remove them from the skillet and add to a large bowl.

Add the remaining 4 tablespoons of butter to the skillet and cook the celery and leeks. Cook the vegetables 8-10 minutes, until they are tender.

Add the celery, leeks, parsley and herbs to the large bowl with the mushrooms. Season with salt and fresh pepper. Toss to combine.

Add bread cubes to the vegetable mixture and toss to combine. Taste for seasoning. Add more salt if necessary.

Add the oysters, oyster liquid and turkey stock to the vegetables and stir to combine. Transfer to the casserole dish and cover with foil. You can chill until you are ready to bake. Bake the stuffing covered for 45 minutes.

http://loveandduckfat.com/oyster-stuffing-shiitake-mushrooms-leeks/

Oyster and corn chowder with bacon

Oyster chowder with corn and bacon

I lived in New England for 8 years and miss the incredible seafood there. Maine lobster fresh from the ocean, soft shell steamer clams and amazing chowders. There’s nothing quite like it in my new hometown, so I do the next best thing and make it myself. This oyster chowder with corn and bacon is reminiscent of one in a restaurant near Marblehead that isn’t there anymore. It has big chunks of fresh oysters and lots of sweet corn. They are an amazing combination.

Chowder really is one of the best comfort foods. It’s creamy and rich, best served with crackers or some crusty bread. I like to get a big bowl and alternate bites of soup with bites of French bread soaked in the rich broth. Then you clean up the bottom of the bowl with one last swipe of buttered bread. This is not a soup for dieters. The best way to make this is to have some fresh shucked oysters. Please use them if you can. If you’re like me though, shucking oysters in my kitchen just isn’t an option with a baby under foot. My supermarket has containers of fresh oysters for a very decent price. They work just fine for chowder, without all the mess. Another difficult-to-find ingredient is fish stock. I make my own from leftover fish bones and shrimp shells and store it in the freezer just for recipes like this. If you don’t have fish stock, you can use any combination of clam juice, chicken broth or vegetable broth.

Oyster chowder with corn and bacon

Oyster chowder with corn and bacon

Oyster chowder with corn and bacon

Oyster chowder with corn and bacon

Ingredients

  • 1 pint of shucked oysters, with liquid
  • 4 slices of bacon, julienned
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups onion, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • salt (to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup seafood stock, clam juice, chicken stock or vegetable stock (or a combination)
  • 2 Yukon Gold potatoes, diced
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup fresh corn kernels
  • ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped

Method

Strain the oysters, reserving the liquid. Check oysters for any shells and chop them into large chucks if they are very big.

In a large pot, cook bacon over medium heat until brown and crispy. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of fat from the pan. Add butter, onion, celery and garlic to the pot and cook, stirring occasionally until soft but not brown, about 5 minutes. Season with salt, Old Bay seasoning and bay leaf. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and stir. Cook for 5 minutes more.

Gradually add the milk, wine and seafood stock (or substitute) and bring to a boil. Add the potatoes and lower the heat to simmer for 15 minutes, until the potatoes are fork tender. Stir in the cream, corn and parsley. Cook for about 5 minutes. Add in the oysters and their liquid and cook for about 2 minutes more. Add lemon juice. Taste and season with salt and freshly ground pepper.

http://loveandduckfat.com/oyster-chowder-with-corn-and-bacon/

Spanish Octopus Stew | Love and Duck Fat

Spanish Octopus Stew

Octopus is delicious. If the only octopus you’ve had is the kind sitting on a ball of rice, you need to try it again. Try it grilled Mediterranean style or stewed, like in this Spanish style octopus stew inspired by a dish I had on Arrecife, one of the Spanish Canary islands.  Cooked this way, octopus loses its toughness and becomes delicate and tender. Paired with potatoes, mushrooms, and lots of paprika, this is one of those rich and satisfying recipes that highlight octopus to perfection.

Now the only thing you have to conquer is cooking the octopus. I purchase mine fresh or frozen from a seafood market right on the bay. Handling a raw octopus isn’t for the faint hearted. I’m not saying it’s difficult. It’s very easy. But you do have to cook and clean a somewhat disturbing-looking creature. The trick is to dunk the whole octopus in boiling water before you cut it up. This will magically transform a soggy, limp octopus into a firm one that is much easier to handle. Once it’s chopped up into bite-size chunks, the rest is cake. Just throw your ingredients in a pot and let it stew for a few hours.

A few hours? Yes. Octopus is also one of the few seafood items that benefits from a long cooking time. I tried to find other seafood that you can cook like this, but after a not-so-lengthy Google search, I came up with nothing. According to the experts, ALL seafood should be cooked only 10 minutes. Not the octopus. This creature benefits from cooking in its own juices for 4 or 5 hours  (or beating with a plank–something for the more advanced home cook).

Spanish Octopus Stew | Love and Duck Fat

Spanish Octopus Stew | Love and Duck Fat

Preparing the octopus:

I used a 1 1/2 pound fresh octopus for this dish. It looks like a lot, but once the moisture is released, octopus shrinks vastly in size. If you are using frozen octopus, allow it to thaw in the refrigerator first. To prepare, bring a large pot of unsalted water to a hard boil. Place the whole octopus in the boiling water and cook for 8-10 minutes. If you are using several smaller octopus, boil for 2-5 minutes.

You will know the octopus is ready when the color changes from grayish brown to a reddish tone and the flesh becomes firm.

Remove the octopus from the water and allow it to cool on a cutting board. Now chop the legs into 2” pieces, moving up to the head. Get in there, cutting the “tube-like” muscles as close to the head as possible. Stop cutting when you get about an inch from the center point—where the beak is. You don’t want to eat this part. For large octopus, you toss the head as well. With baby octopus, leave the head on, making sure the beak has been removed.

Now you are ready to make your stew.

Spanish Octopus Stew

Spanish Octopus Stew

Ingredients

  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • pinch saffron
  • 1 teaspoon hot smoked paprika
  • 1 ½ teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 cup fish stock, clam juice, chicken stock, vegetable stock or some combination of those
  • 1-2 pounds octopus, prepared as above
  • ¼ teaspoon salt and freshly ground pepper, plus more to taste
  • 1 lb. potatoes, cut into 1’ chunks
  • 1 lb. white mushrooms, cut into quarters
  • ¼ cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley leaves, chopped

Method

Sauté the onion and celery in olive oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat, about 5 minutes until they are soft but not brown. Add the garlic and saffron and stir a few minutes more. Add the hot and sweet paprika, bay leaf, white wine and stock. Add the octopus and season with ¼ teaspoon of salt and black pepper. Bring to a low simmer, cover and cook for 3 hours.

Uncover the stew and add the potatoes and mushrooms. Cover and cook for another 40 minutes. Uncover and stir in lemon juice. Taste and season again with salt and pepper if needed. Stir in parsley right before serving.

http://loveandduckfat.com/spanish-octopus-stew/

Wild salmon with dill sauce and black Forbidden Rice

This delicious dish with wild salmon and dill sauce paired with black Forbidden Rice and simple green salad is full of healthy, antioxidant-rich ingredients. It’s low in saturated fat and high in omega-3 fatty acids. The taste is luxurious. I guarantee you won’t be disappointed!

Salmon is one of my favorite fish, but I have been steering away from Atlantic farm raised salmon for a while now due to the environmental impact of the farms and health concerns from chemical additives.  When I can find fresh, wild salmon, I jump to purchase it. If you don’t eat a lot of wild salmon, the first think you’ll notice it the color. It’s usually much darker. To get that familiar pink color in farmed fish, they actually have to add carotene to the feed. Wild salmon is also more flavorful; unlike the near tasteless farmed variety. It can get confusing choosing which type of seafood is safe and good for the environment, which is why I love the site, seafood.edf.org, for great information on what types of seafood are safe to eat.

One of my favorite parts of salmon is the skin. I could eat it just by itself. It’s chewy, oily, crispy deliciousness. And when I start to think about all of that oil, I remind myself that it’s GOOD fat. Yes, this is the part of the fish loaded with omega-3 fatty acids that reduce inflammation and may just lower your risks of chronic disease. So, embrace this fatty treat and revel in its goodness. If you are one of those people who peel your fish skin off in disgust, give it another try. It may just be that it wasn’t cooked properly. The skin should be seasoned well, and really crispy. There’s a technique to this, and it’s pretty easy to get results like the best restaurants.

I paired the fish with black rice, also known as Forbidden rice. This heirloom rice was once grown just for Chinese nobility and can now be found in 4 pound bags on Amazon. I love the dramatic color, and prefer the complex, nutty flavor and chewy texture of black rice to brown.  It has virtually the same antioxidant-rich bran as brown rice, but with the added health benefits of anthocyanins, pigments that produce the dark color.  According to a report presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, “Just a spoonful of black rice bran contains more health promoting anthocyanin antioxidants than are found in a spoonful of blueberries, but with less sugar and more fiber and vitamin E antioxidants,” said Zhimin Xu, Associate Professor at the Department of Food Science at Louisiana State University Agricultural Center in Baton Rouge, La.

With this dish, I also included a mixture of organic baby greens from the market. I love  SUPERGREENS! from Organicgirl. It has a colorful and healthy mix of red chard, Swiss chard and arugula. Tossed in a simple vinaigrette; it’s an easy and healthy side.

wild salmon with dill sauce and black rice

Wwild salmon with dill sauce and black rice

Wild Salmon with Dill Sauce

Wild salmon with dill sauce

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 salmon filets, skin on, 6-7 ounces each
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • For the dill sauce:
  • 4 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh dill leaves, chopped

Method

Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit

To prepare the salmon, season both sides with salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the fillets to the pan, skin side down. Cook until lightly browned, about 3-4 minutes. Remove the filets from the pan and transfer them to a baking sheet, skin side up. Place the fish in the oven and cook about 5-6 minutes more, until medium rare in the center and flaky on the outside.

To make the sauce, combine yogurt, lemon juice, olive oil and dill. Season with salt and pepper

http://loveandduckfat.com/wild-salmon-with-dill-sauce-and-black-forbidden-rice/

Black Forbidden Rice

Black Forbidden rice

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 36 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 cup black rice
  • 2 shallots, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 cups fish stock
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Method

To prepare the rice, rinse under cold water. Saute shallots in olive oil until tender, but not brown, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and stir until fragrant, 1 minute. Add shallot mixture, rice, stock, salt and pepper to a rice cooker. This is the time to stick your finger in the pot and taste the seasoning of the stock to make sure it tastes good. Now close the lid and allow to cook roughly 35 minutes. When the rice is cooked, add the lemon juice and stir.

http://loveandduckfat.com/wild-salmon-with-dill-sauce-and-black-forbidden-rice/

Walnut oil Vinaigrette

Quick walnut oil viniagrette

This recipe makes enough vinaigrette for a few salads. Use just a splash for the amount of vegetable in this dish and save the rest for later.

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 tablespoons walnut oil
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • Pinch garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar

Method

Whisk together ingredients in a large bowl. Toss salad greens in the vinaigrette and serve.

http://loveandduckfat.com/wild-salmon-with-dill-sauce-and-black-forbidden-rice/

 

Find recipes on Love and Duck Fat

Recipe Index

appetizers

Balsamic glazed Brussels sprouts
Black olive tapenade with anchovy
Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish
Duck fat confit of garlic and mushrooms
Daikon and carrot kimchi


Fried green papaya recipe


Prosciutto, Burrata cheese and fig crostini

Roasted okra with soy and garlic glaze

baby food

Breast milk pancake recipe | Whole wheat and banana
Chicken and peas
Chicken, carrot, green bean and potato puree
Chicken stew
Quinoa ratatouille
Sweet potato bites

Turkey dinner
Strawberry Smoothie
Vegetable lasagna puree

breakfast

Asparagus and bacon quiche recipe
Banana & chocolate breakfast cookies
Challah French toast, burrata, sliced peaches
Coconut quinoa porridge
Gluten free pumpkin cake muffins
French toast with roasted strawberries and tarragon cream

cake and cookie

Apple cake with whipped cream frosting
Banana & chocolate breakfast cookies
Chocolate cake with mousse filling and chocolate port wine frosting
Chocolate cake with orange French buttercream and ganache
Chocolate chip cake
Chocolate coconut cake with coconut meringue buttercream frosting
Chocolate espresso cake with cooked flour buttercream
Chocolate pumpkin cake with spiced brown butter frosting
Homemade s’more cookie recipe
Starfruit upside-down cake

dessert

Candied orange slices
Chocolate cake with mousse filling and chocolate port wine frosting
Chocolate cake with orange French buttercream and ganache
Chocolate espresso cake with cooked flour buttercream
Coconut Hot Chocolate
Gluten free pumpkin cake muffins
Gooey gingerbread cakes
Homemade and healthy watermelon jello
Lavender, brown sugar panna cotta with lemon sauce
Nutmeg & yogurt panna cotta, cranberry coulis
Spiced brown butter cooked flour frosting
Strawberry mousse in chocolate cups

main

Caribbean goat stew
Chinese Five Spice Cornish Hens
Easy eggplant pasta
Farmer’s market tofu coconut curry
London Broil with wild mushroom sauce
Mussels, scallops and bok choy in Thai green coconut curry
Pasta with sausage, butternut squash and spinach
Pork rib chops, goat cheese polenta, roasted fennel and sauteed apple
Roasted pork loin with shallot and tarragon cream sauce
Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks
Smoked salt Padron pepper and goat cheese tacos
Spanish octopus stew
Tuna tomato melt recipe | The best ever
Turkey meatballs, tagliatelle pasta, sundried tomatoes and roasted vegetables
Wild salmon and dill sauce with black Forbidden Rice

pasta

Easy eggplant pasta
Pasta with sausage, butternut squash and spinach
Turkey meatballs, tagliatelle pasta, sundried tomatoes and roasted vegetables
Walnut, parsley and basil pesto

pork

Pork rib chops, goat cheese polenta, roasted fennel and sauteed apple
Roasted pork loin with shallot and tarragon cream sauce
White bean and sausage soup

salad




seafood

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Mussels, scallops and bok choy in Thai green coconut curry
Oyster chowder with corn and bacon
Oyster stuffing with shiitake mushrooms and leeks
Spanish octopus stew
Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks
Tuna tomato melt recipe | The best ever
Wild salmon and dill sauce with black Forbidden Rice

side

Artichoke and mushroom casserole
Balsamic glazed Brussels sprouts
Broccoli rabe (rapini) with garlic and olive oil
Duck fat confit of garlic and mushrooms
Daikon and carrot kimchi

Duck fat recipe | Roasted potatoes and shallots


Fried green papaya recipe
Green beans with crispy bacon
Mustard greens with garlic and sesame
Oyster stuffing with shiitake mushrooms and leeks
Perfect roasted potatoes
Roasted fennel
Roasted kohlrabi with garlic and Parmesan
Roasted okra with soy and garlic glaze

soup

Cauliflower and wild rice chowder


Oyster chowder with corn and bacon
Roasted Brussels sprout soup, chestnut toast
Roasted cauliflower and almond soup
Split pea soup with smoked turkey
Tuna tomato melt recipe | The best ever
White bean and sausage soup

vegetable

Artichoke and mushroom casserole
Balsamic glazed Brussels sprouts
Broccoli rabe (rapini) with garlic and olive oil
Daikon and carrot kimchi


Fried green papaya recipe
Green beans with crispy bacon


Mustard greens with garlic and sesame

Roasted fennel
Roasted kohlrabi with garlic and Parmesan
Roasted okra with soy and garlic glaze
Smoked salt Padron pepper and goat cheese tacos
Walnut, parsley and basil pesto

Thai mussels and scallops recipe

Mussels, scallops and bok choy in Thai green coconut curry

This recipe with mussels, scallops and bok choy in Thai green coconut curry cooks in minutes with ingredients available in the international foods section of your supermarket, giving you a fresh curry dish that looks—and tastes—like you went to a lot of effort.

While the jarred green curry paste doesn’t hold up to freshly made versions, most of us don’t have the time or the ingredients to make one from scratch. This recipe is a fast and easy way to bring the taste of Thai home, and is of better quality than what you will find in most restaurants.

I like to walk by the seafood section of my supermarket just to check out the freshness of what they have on display that day. I rarely make a purchase because I live just a few blocks from one of the best seafood markets in Miami.  On this particular day, the mussels looked fresh and I had a craving for scallops. At $20.95 a pound for the scallops, I only bought six, along with a pound of the more reasonably priced mussels (only $3.95 a pound).  Looking for good seafood recipes, I came across this one for Thai Shrimp, Scallop and Mussel Curry. Having most of the ingredients on hand (more and less); I gave the recipe a shot.

It was easy to make and full of flavor. The bok choy was perfectly cooked and still crunchy and the tomatoes add some sweet, juicy bites to the dish. Serve it with a side of Jasmine rice and you’ll find it irresistible to stop dunking spoonfuls into the slightly spicy, creamy, coconut milk sauce.

Thai mussels and scallops recipe

Mussels, scallops and bok choy in Thai green coconut curry

51

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ½ onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons garlic, chopped
  • 3-4 tablespoons Thai Kitchen green curry paste (or similar)
  • 1 can unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • ¼ cup white wine or chicken broth
  • ¼ -1/2 teaspoon of Sriracha (to taste)
  • 1 pound mussels, cleaned
  • 1 large bok choy, cleaned and sliced
  • ½ pound sea scallops, cleaned and cut in half crosswise
  • 3/4 cup small tomatoes (cherry, grape), sliced in half
  • 3 scallions
  • ½ cup fresh basil
  • ½ cup fresh cilantro

Method

Prepare everything before cooking; this dish cooks up in 8-10 minutes. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and cook until soft. Add the garlic and curry paste and stir about 1 minute until you smell that delicious garlic. Now add the coconut milk and increase the heat to high. Stir in the fish sauce, lime juice, wine (or chicken broth) and Sriacha. Cover for 2 minutes to allow the flavors to blend.

Remove the lid and add the bok choy and mussels. Cover and cook about 2 minutes until you see some of the shells opening. Remove the lid and stir, then add in the scallops and cover again. Cook for another few minutes until the mussels open and the scallops are just cooked. Remove from heat and stir in the tomatoes.

Pour into bowls and top with scallions, basil and cilantro.

http://loveandduckfat.com/mussels-scallops-and-bok-choy-in-thai-green-coconut-curry/

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