Search results for seafood

Oyster and Sausage Gumbo Recipe

Sausage and Oyster Gumbo Recipe

If you love oysters and New Orleans cooking like we do, this sausage and oyster gumbo recipe is for you!

It’s full of fresh vegetables, smoky sausage and oysters. The flavors are perfect together; making this one of the best gumbo recipes I’ve ever had.

Do you love Louisiana food? We certainly do. Whether it’s Cajun or Creole; we can’t get enough. I’m talking about recipes like etouffée, crawfish, boudin, jambalaya and gumbo. We live south of New Orleans—Miami—and we can’t seem to find a restaurant that serves good Louisiana cooking.

Our way to solve this deficiency is to cook at home, which usually results in food even better than what we would get in New Orleans. As I’ve mentioned before, we are lucky enough to have access to super-fresh Gulf seafood from Casablanca’s seafood market. This legendary market has boats arriving daily and serves up an astounding array of fresh local seafood right in the heart of downtown Miami.

Unfortunately, the secret is out. Now I have to jockey for a parking space to get my seafood fix and wait forever in lines. Sad me 🙁

To make this heavenly sausage and oyster gumbo recipe, you can use freshly shucked oysters or save yourself the trouble and buy the pre-shucked refrigerated oysters in the seafood section of a good grocery store. Buy some nice Louisiana-style smoked sausage or Andouille and you are good to go—except for file powder. Do you have it? Don’t fret if you don’t. File powder is not necessary for a good gumbo. Even the folks in Louisiana will tell you so. I prefer to add okra in its place. It thickens gumbo just like file would.

Roux Spoon | Oyster and Sausage Gumbo

Roux Spoon | Not Necessary for Oyster and Sausage Gumbo

The key to making a gumbo is the roux. It sounds like something magical and hard to do when you hear people mention it, but it’s very easy. I have to mention my sister-in-law here because she gifted me an heirloom quality roux spoon. Isn’t it nifty? I never knew they had a “thing” just for this purpose!

I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as we did! Check back soon when I’ll be sharing my favorite recipe for Shrimp Etouffée. What’s your favorite Louisiana dish?

 

Oyster and Sausage Gumbo Recipe

Sausage and Oyster Gumbo Recipe

Sausage and Oyster Gumbo Recipe

Sausage and Oyster Gumbo Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 pound smoked sausage (Andouille), sliced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil or butter
  • ½ cup flour
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 cup celery, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 7 cups chicken or seafood broth
  • 1 pound fresh or frozen okra (sliced)
  • 1 can (15 oz.) chopped tomatoes + juice
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon salt and freshly cracked pepper + more to taste
  • 1 pint raw, shucked oysters (20 pounds unshucked) plus liquor
  • Tabasco sauce (to taste)
  • Chopped fresh parsley or green onion (for serving)
  • 3-4 cups cooked white rice (for serving)

Method

In a skillet over medium heat, brown the sausage well in the 2 tablespoons of oil. Remove sausage from the skillet and set aside.

Using a large heavy pot, melt the butter over medium-low heat. When the butter melts and foams, add the flour. Use a wooden spoon to stir the flour into the butter to prevent any lumps. Continue to cook and stir the roux until it is brown and nutty-smelling, about 15 minutes.

Recipe adapted from Shrimp and Oyster Gumbo by Tyler Florence http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/shrimp-and-oyster-gumbo-with-okra-recipe.html

Add the onion, celery, red and green bell pepper, garlic, Cajun seasoning and thyme to the roux and cook for 10 minutes, until the vegetables are soft.

Pour in the chicken stock. Add the okra, tomatoes, bay leaves, salt and pepper. Bring the mixture to a boil, and then cover and reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 45 minutes, checking and stirring occasionally.

Toss the oysters (and oyster liquor) in the pot and cook another 10-15 minutes. Taste for seasoning and add more salt, pepper and a dash of Tabasco sauce if needed.

To serve: Ladle gumbo in a wide bowl. Top with cooked rice. Sprinkle with green onion or parsley. Don’t forget to place the hot sauce on the table.

http://loveandduckfat.com/sausage-oyster-gumbo-recipe/

Recipe adapter from Shrimp and Oyster Gumbo by Tyler Florence

Halibut with Sherry cream sauce

Halibut with sherry cream sauce

There was a restaurant in Salem, Massachusetts that served halibut with sherry cream sauce and I still crave it fifteen years later. They served a perfectly pan-seared filet of halibut perched on top of a bed of creamy mashed potatoes with asparagus. The best part was the intensely-flavored sherry cream sauce. Fantastic paired with any fish or seafood; this sauce is incredibly tasty.

Halibut with Sherry cream sauce recipe

Halibut with Sherry cream sauce

This is the kind of sauce that can be difficult to create at home because the secret is in the stock.  In the restaurant, they had an ample supply of shrimp and lobster shells, along with celery tops, herbs and onion skins available. Boiled for an afternoon, the stock was then strained and reduced with sherry and lots of cream. The result was a heady jolt of fresh seafood flavor, along with the flavors of celery and herbs mingling with sweet sherry.

Home chefs usually don’t go to all that trouble. Who has the time? With a baby at home, I sure don’t!

With a little creativity, I managed to make a pretty close approximation of the dish with easy-to-find ingredients. It didn’t take me all day and everyone loved it. I substituted a slab of roasted cauliflower for the mashed potatoes. It’s a fun way to serve this vegetable, and a great substitute for buttery mashed potatoes.

Do you have a favorite restaurant dish you would love to make at home? Please share in the comments!

Pan seared halibut

Halibut with Sherry cream sauce

Halibut with sherry cream sauce recipe

Halibut with sherry cream sauce

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

    The sherry cream sauce:
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 finely chopped shallots
  • ¼ cup finely chopped celery
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 cup seafood stock or clam broth (or lobster base)
  • ¼ cup sherry
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • For the halibut:
  • 4 6-ounce halibut fillets
  • coarse Kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Method

The sherry cream sauce:

Heat a heavy saucepan on medium heat. Melt the butter and add the shallots and celery. Sauté for 10 minutes, until the vegetables are lightly caramelized but not brown. Add the garlic and cook for 2 minutes more.

Deglaze the pan with the stock and sherry. Add the tomato paste and bring to a simmer. Continue to cook on low heat until the mixture is reduced, about 10 minutes.

Add the heavy cream and cook on low heat for 5 more minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

The halibut

Pat the halibut fillets dry and season both sides with salt and pepper.

Add olive oil in a skillet until shimmering. Add the halibut and cook on medium high heat until brown on the bottom, about five minutes. Flip the fillets and add the butter to the pan. Cook 2 minutes longer, tilting the pan and spooning the butter over the top of the fillets. Transfer fillets to a plate.

http://loveandduckfat.com/halibut-sherry-cream-sauce/

Roasted Cauliflower

Roasted Cauliflower

Cauliflower has been called one of the trendiest vegetables of 2014. Epicurious magazine called it the vegetable of 2013, so I guess it’s having a good run of popularity. The only reason I know this is because I’m wrapped up in the great big food blogosphere and keep track of these things.

I can honestly say I eat more cauliflower now than I ever did (not to be trendy–I know how to cook it now). I eat it in soups, like this roasted cauliflower soup. Its great mashed or in curries too, but cauliflower is at its best simply roasted with a dusting of coarse salt and freshly ground pepper. I like cutting it in great big slabs before throwing it in the oven. It’s easy to do and so addicting, I’ve been guilty of eating it with my fingers while standing in the kitchen.

You can serve roasted cauliflower as an easy side dish with just about anything. It’s a great substitute for starchy potatoes and pairs well with both seafood and red meats. It also makes a great main dish, especially thick-cut and served as a “steak”. The nutty/sweet flavor it acquires from roasting is completely different than the tasteless, limply-steamed versions served up in restaurants around the country. If you passed on cauliflower before, this recipe will make you a believer.

Roasted Cauliflower Recipes

Roasted Cauliflower

Roasted Cauliflower

Ingredients

  • 1 head cauliflower, leaves and stem removed
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • garlic powder (optional)
  • coriander (optional)

Method

Preheat oven to 400° F/ 190° C

Wash and dry the cauliflower head. Using a large knife, slice through the entire cauliflower to make 1-inch thick slices. The ends will crumble into florets, but you should get 2-4 intact slices. Lay the slices and florets on a sheet pan drizzled with olive oil.

Season to taste with salt, pepper and optional spices. Turn cauliflower to coat in oil, seasoning both sides.

Place into preheated oven and cook for 20-30 minutes, turning once. Remove from the oven when the cauliflower is browned and the stems are easily pierced with a fork.

http://loveandduckfat.com/roasted-cauliflower/

 

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Welcome to my new recipe search page! You can find recipes below organized by meal, method, season, holiday, world cuisine, category or ingredient.

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If you can't find what you need, drop me a line and I just may cook it up for you!
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Recipe Index

Appetizers

Balsamic Glazed Brussels Sprouts
Black Olive Tapenade with Anchovy
Ceviche recipe | Cherry Tomato and White Fish
Duck Fat Confit of Garlic and Mushrooms
Daikon and Carrot Kimchi


Fried Green Papaya


Prosciutto, Burrata cheese and Fig Crostini

Roasted okra with soy and garlic glaze

Apple, Blueberry Spinach & Banana Puree
Breast Milk Pancake Recipe | Whole wheat and Banana
Chicken and peas
Chicken, carrot, green bean and potato puree
Chicken stew
Quinoa ratatouille
Sweet potato bites

Turkey dinner
Strawberry Smoothie
Vegetable lasagna puree

Breakfast

Asparagus and bacon quiche recipe
Banana & chocolate breakfast cookies
Banana Bread Upside-Down Cake
Challah French toast, burrata, sliced peaches
Coconut quinoa porridge
Gluten free pumpkin cake muffins
French toast with roasted strawberries and tarragon cream

Cake and Cookie

Apple cake with whipped cream frosting
Banana & chocolate breakfast cookies
Chocolate cake with mousse filling and chocolate port wine frosting
Chocolate cake with orange French buttercream and ganache
Chocolate chip cake
Chocolate coconut cake with coconut meringue buttercream frosting
Chocolate espresso cake with cooked flour buttercream
Chocolate Espresso Crinkle Cookies
Chocolate pumpkin cake with spiced brown butter frosting
Chocolate pumpkin cake with spiced brown butter frosting
Homemade s’more cookie recipe
Starfruit upside-down cake

Dessert

Bailey’s Irish Cream Panna Cotta with Espresso Caramel Sauce
Banana Bread Upside-Down Cake
Blueberry Cupcakes, Lemon Filling & Blueberry Cream Cheese Frosting
Candied orange slices
Chocolate cake with mousse filling and chocolate port wine frosting
Chocolate cake with orange French buttercream and ganache
Chocolate espresso cake with cooked flour buttercream
Coconut Hot Chocolate
Gluten free pumpkin cake muffins
Gooey gingerbread cakes
Green Tea & Honey Sponge Cake
Guinness Ice Cream Float
Homemade and healthy watermelon jello
Lavender, brown sugar panna cotta with lemon sauce
Nutmeg & yogurt panna cotta, cranberry coulis
Pistachio Cardamom Shortbread Cookies
Spiced brown butter cooked flour frosting
Strawberry mousse in chocolate cups
Triple Chocolate Guinness Cake with Easy Bailey’s Irish Crème Anglaise

Main

Caribbean goat stew
Chinese Five Spice Cornish Hens
Easy eggplant pasta
Farmer’s market tofu coconut curry
Guinness Pork Loin
Lamb Shanks Recipe
London Broil with wild mushroom sauce
Mussels, scallops and bok choy in Thai green coconut curry
Pasta with sausage, butternut squash and spinach
Pork Carnitas Tacos
Pork rib chops, goat cheese polenta, roasted fennel and sauteed apple
Roasted pork loin with shallot and tarragon cream sauce
Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks
Sausage and Oyster Gumbo
Smoked salt Padron pepper and goat cheese tacos
Spanish octopus stew
Spinach Picadillo
Tuna tomato melt recipe | The best ever
Turkey meatballs, tagliatelle pasta, sundried tomatoes and roasted vegetables
Wild salmon and dill sauce with black Forbidden Rice

Pasta

Easy eggplant pasta
Orzo Salad Recipe
Pasta with sausage, butternut squash and spinach
Turkey meatballs, tagliatelle pasta, sundried tomatoes and roasted vegetables
Walnut, parsley and basil pesto

Pork

Guinness Pork Loin
Pork rib chops, goat cheese polenta, roasted fennel and sauteed apple
Pork Carnitas Tacos
Roasted pork loin with shallot and tarragon cream sauce
White bean and sausage soup

Salad






Mango Salad with Mozzarella & Mint
Orzo Salad Recipe

Seafood


Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Mussels, scallops and bok choy in Thai green coconut curry
Oyster chowder with corn and bacon
Oyster stuffing with shiitake mushrooms and leeks
Spanish octopus stew
Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks
Sausage and Oyster Gumbo
Tuna tomato melt recipe | The best ever
Wild salmon and dill sauce with black Forbidden Rice

Side

Artichoke and mushroom casserole
Balsamic glazed Brussels sprouts
Broccoli rabe (rapini) with garlic and olive oil
Duck fat confit of garlic and mushrooms
Daikon and carrot kimchi

Duck fat recipe | Roasted potatoes and shallots


Fried green papaya recipe
Green beans with crispy bacon
Mustard greens with garlic and sesame
Oyster stuffing with shiitake mushrooms and leeks
Perfect roasted potatoes
Roasted fennel
Roasted kohlrabi with garlic and Parmesan
Roasted okra with soy and garlic glaze
Spicy Pickled Onion Recipe
Spicy Szechuan Roasted Okra

Soup

Cauliflower and wild rice chowder


Oyster chowder with corn and bacon
Roasted Brussels sprout soup, chestnut toast
Roasted cauliflower and almond soup
Sausage and Oyster Gumbo
Split pea soup with smoked turkey
Tuna tomato melt recipe | The best ever
White bean and sausage soup

Vegetable

Artichoke and mushroom casserole
Balsamic glazed Brussels sprouts
Broccoli rabe (rapini) with garlic and olive oil
Daikon and carrot kimchi


Fried green papaya recipe
Green beans with crispy bacon


Mustard greens with garlic and sesame

Roasted fennel
Roasted kohlrabi with garlic and Parmesan
Roasted okra with soy and garlic glaze
Spicy Szechuan Roasted Okra
Smoked salt Padron pepper and goat cheese tacos
Walnut, parsley and basil pesto

Salmon with Dill sauce

Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks

I’m writing this blog after a succession of recipe “fails” that has me wondering if I should be writing recipes at all. They weren’t epic fails, but when you botch a birthday cake, Christmas cookies and sugar cookies within a few weeks, it’s enough to shake your confidence. Then I think about why I started Love and Duck Fat in the first place. One of the reasons was to challenge myself to learn something new. When you challenge yourself, there are usually failures involved, or it wouldn’t be a challenge.

Baking (and dessert making in general) is hard for me. Why? It requires precision. I spent years as an artist learning to embrace happy accidents, paint drips, imprecise lines and sloppy paint. This is very hard to do when you are trained from childhood to color within the lines. I learned to love imprecision because it was more beautiful, wild and freeing. Even to the viewer’s eyes. That is what I wanted to aspire to in art, and I can’t say I ever got there, but I was close.

Baking is just the opposite. It requires exact measurements, precise cooking times and a perfectly steady hand if you want your decorating to look anything close to edible. So I challenge myself with chocolate pumpkin cakes, but I am the first to admit baking is not my forte.

I am embracing my fails as learning experiences and moving on, albeit in a direction I’m more comfortable: seafood.

Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks

Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks

I was able to get my hands on a gorgeous fillet of wild Sockeye salmon, and paired it with a creamy dill sauce, black Beluga lentils and sautéed leeks. I love the color of the salmon against the dramatic black of the lentils, similar to another recipe where I paired salmon with black rice. The Beluga lentils are a little more expensive and hard to find (buy them on Amazon). They are round in appearance and glisten like caviar, thus the name. You can substitute French green or brown lentils, and the taste will be just as good.

Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks

Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks

Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks

Salmon with dill sauce, Beluga lentils, sautéed leeks

Ingredients

    Lentils:
  • 1 cup Beluga lentils
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 teaspoon salt (plus more to taste)
  • 1 whole garlic clove, peeled
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • Sautéed leeks
  • 4-6 leeks, white and pale green parts only
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • Salt
  • Salmon with dill sauce
  • 4 (6 ounce) salmon fillets (I prefer skin-on, you can prepare without)
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
  • 4 dill sprigs
  • 2/3 cup dry white wine
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • handful fresh dill, chopped
  • Salt and pepper

Method

Bring the lentils, vegetable broth, and 1 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a heavy saucepan. Add the garlic clove and bay leaf. Reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook on low heat for 20-25 minutes until lentils are tender-firm. Drain and return to the pan. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground pepper. Keep warm and covered.

While the lentils are cooking, prepare the leeks. I like to cut them in half crosswise, and then quarter them lengthwise, into strips. Wash them well in cold water to make sure all the sand is removed. Dry well before cooking.

Heat olive oil and butter in a large skillet. Add the leeks and cook on medium-low heat for about 10 minutes or more, turning every few minutes. You want them to brown slightly and become very soft. Sprinkle with salt and taste.

Pat salmon dry and season both sides with salt and pepper. Heat the oil or butter on medium-high heat in a nonstick skillet. When hot, place the salmon in the skillet, skin-side-down. Place a sprig of dill on each piece. Cook the salmon for 4 minutes, then turn. Cook another 2-4 minutes, depending on the thickness of each piece, and how you prefer to serve. Remove to a plate.

Pour the white wine into the hot pan. Add the minced garlic and cook for 2 minutes. Add the cream and cook for another 2-5 minutes, until the mixture is thickened and creamy. Add the chopped dill and lemon juice. Season with salt and fresh pepper to taste.

http://loveandduckfat.com/salmon-dill-sauce-beluga-lentils-sauteed-leeks/

 

 In the spirit of full disclosure, this post contains an affiliate link to a product I purchased and used myself. I recommend this product. If you decide to buy any of these items, I may be able to buy a cheap cup of coffee someday from the commission I receive. 

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

I’m fortunate enough to live very close to one of Miami’s best seafood markets, Casablanca Sea Food. Every day, they have a variety of fresh caught, local fish and shrimp brought from small fishing boats. Located on the Miami River, they have a restaurant too, if you feel like stopping by. I am a regular there, picking up some of my favorites: yellowtail snapper, hogfish, stone crabs and octopus. I recently began eating corvina, also known as white sea bass. It’s a plentiful fish in this area, with a light, white meat that is perfect for ceviche. I can get a pound for under $10.00, which makes me wonder why I don’t make this ceviche recipe with cherry tomato and white fish more often!

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Ceviche is one of those dishes you can adapt easily to fit your tastes. I like to make it with fresh avocado, crunchy corn or cherry tomatoes. You can use red, yellow or a combination of colorful tomatoes. However you make this recipe, it will be a hit. It’s incredibly easy to do and tastes as good as any expensive restaurant ceviche. If you don’t know already, the acidity in the lime juice cooks the fish. As soon as the fish touches the juice, you will see the color change to an opaque white. After an hour or so, the outside of the fish pieces are entirely white and it’s time to eat. Serve as an elegant appetizer in small glasses or tasting spoons — or if you are like me, grab a big bowl and dig in.

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Cherry tomato and white fish Ceviche recipe

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Ceviche recipe | Cherry tomato and white fish

Ingredients

  • 1 pound very fresh white fish (corvina, white sea bass, tilapia or red snapper), cut into ½ inch chunks
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 cup green pepper, chopped
  • 2/3 cup fresh squeezed lime juice (5-6 limes)
  • ½ small red onion, finely diced or cut into slivers
  • 1 serrano chili, seeded and finely diced (mild) or very thinly sliced with seeds (hot)
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves
  • ½ cup clam juice or Clamato (optional)
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Method

Combine all of the ingredients in a glass or ceramic dish. Season with salt and pepper. Stir well, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Stir again; making sure the fish is in contact with the lime juice. Chill for another 30 minutes, up to several hours. Taste and season again with salt if needed. Spoon into martini glasses or serving spoons to serve as an appetizer.

http://loveandduckfat.com/ceviche-recipe-cherry-tomato-white-fish/

 

 

 

 

 

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